The Classics Book Tag.

Jillian has tagged me for the The Classics Book Tag, which I thought looked rather fun, so here are my answers....
An over-hyped classic you really didn’t like: 'The Paliser Novels' by Anthony Trollope. I wouldn't go so far as to say they're "over-hyped" and I do appreciate people love them, but, aside from Can You Forgive Her? and The Eustace Diamonds I really didn't like them.

Favourite time period to read about?: I do have a particular liking for books set in pre-Victorian times, say mid-18th Century to early 1830s. This was about the time of the Industrial Revolution, but the books I like largely (not entirely) ignore that aspect. The actual effects of the Industrial Revolution, the social novels that is, tended to come in the 1840s and it's not that I don't like those, I positively do, but the mid-18th Century - early 1830s seem simpler times, a time when, though the changes were occurring, the country wasn't ravaged by industry and rampant capitalism. Here's a few examples:
Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen (1811), Pickwick Papers by Charles Dickens (1836-37), Adam Bede by George Eliot (1859; set in 1799), The Journal of the Tour to the Hebrides with Samuel Johnson by James Boswell (1786) and A Country Parson: the Diary of James Woodforde (1758-1802).

F
avourite fairy tale?: 
The Ugly Duckling by Hans Christian Andersen (1843).
Faery Tales by Hans Christian Andersen illustrated by Maxwell Armfield (1910).

Hans Andersen's Fairy Tales illustrated by W. Heath Robinson (1916).

What is the most embarrassing classic you haven’t read?: Le Morte D'Arthur by Thomas Malory (1485). I'm not embarrassed that I think everyone's read it but me, more because I have been meaning to read it for years and I have an absolute block with it, even though I'm sure I'll love it!
The Romance of King Arthur and his Knights of the Round Table, abridged from Malory's Le Morte D'Arthur,
illustrated by Arthur Rackham (1917).

Top 5 classics you want to read: Aside from Le Morte D'Arthur - As I Crossed the Bride of Dreams (11th Century), The Golden Ass by Apuleius (2nd Century), Elizabethan Love StoriesThe Castle of Otranto by Horace Walpole (1764), and Spring Torrents by Ivan Turgenev (1872).

Favourite modern book/series based on a classic?: He Knew He Was Right by Anthony Trollope (1869). I know this is not exactly modern, but it's an excellent take on Shakespeare's Othello.

Favourite movie version / tv series based on a classic?: Has to be Pride and Prejudice directed by Joe Wright (2005).
Worst classic to movie adaptation?: I haven't actually seen any bad ones - I don't watch many films at all, so when I do they tend to be almost universally liked! I have heard that William Wyler did terrible things to Wuthering Heights in 1939, and, the short snatches of it I've seen, it does seem very wooden.
Wuthering Heights starring Laurence Olivier and Merle Oberon
Favourite editions you’d like to collect more of?: I'm not much of a collector of different editions, I'm really not bothered as to what the book looks like or who published it, just so long as it's readable. That said annotated editions are a God-send for certain novels and I wouldn't mind an annotated Finnegans Wake and Ulysses by James Joyce.

An underhyped classic?: So many! Émile Zola's short stories, Richard Kennedy's A Boy at the Hogarth Press (1972), which is about Kennedy's experience working for Leonard and Virginia Woolf, James Woodforde's Diary, Émile Najac and Victorien Sardou's Let's Get a Divorce! (1880), Diary of a Pilgrimage by Jerome K. Jerome (1891), Francis Kilvert's Diary (1870-79), and Marcel Proust's Jean Santeuil (1952) come to mind.

I shall tag anyone who wants to join in! 😊

Comments

  1. A Boy at the Hogwarth Press sounds really good. I've got an annotated Ulysses tucked away somewhere. As I recall, the whole book is the annotations, and a separate book is required to actually read Ulysses. Lately, I've felt that I'd prefer Finnegan's Wake of the two. I've never seen the Laurence Olivier Wuthering Heights. I think at the time everyone thought it was wonderful. I don't get the Laurence Olivier thing: to me he does seem quite dull. Yes for the 2005 Pride & Prejudice! I love that one too. Have you ever seen the 1995? If not, I recommend it. :) I'd forgotten about "The Ugly Duckling." I need to get a collection of fairy tales and reread them all -- I love "The Ugly Duckling." I love your answer for favorite time period. I agree: the early time was more peaceful. And contained Sense and Sensibility, which is shaped like a heart. :) Thanks for doing this, o! So fun to read. xxx

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    1. I did like reading FW. Didn't understand 98% of it but hey! :)

      I love the 1995 P&P, remember watching it on Sunday evenings. As for fairy tales, I'm really into them at present. I've just bought Victorian Fairy Tales published by OUP, which I'm pretty sure Tom from Wuthering Expectations recommended to me a while ago. Looking forward to reading it :)

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  2. I loved Diary of a Pilgrimage, why haven't there been any recent adaptation of books by Jerome K. Jerome? I wonder if he doesn't translate well from page to screen. And I also have that volume of Victorian Fairy Tales, I should move it up on my TBR list.

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    1. I'm always surprised at how hard it is to come across Jerome K Jerome books, to be honest. Aside from Three Men that is. As for screen adaptations... I would love to see the 1956 film. But yes, as you say, there's no recent adaptations - perhaps he's regarded as old fashioned? I don't know, it's a shame. I wish the BBC or ITV would do one, it would be most welcome :)

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  3. That Pride & Prejudice adaption is my favorite to watch when I desire to watch anything at all. : )

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    1. Yes, it's pretty much my favourite as well! A definite go-to :) I should watch it again soon, it's been a while...

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  4. I'd like to know your answers to these questions:
    http://thelittlewhiteattic.blogspot.com/2017/01/author-questions.html
    My answers: http://thelittlewhiteattic.blogspot.com/2017/04/author-questions-now-answered.html

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    1. Thanks Di, I'll check that out and likely have a go myself this weekend :)

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  5. Speaking of adaptations, if you haven't watched Love and Friendship (adaptation of Jane Austen's Lady Susan), you should. It's a brilliant film.

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    1. I think I've vaguely heard of that film, I'll have to look it up. Thanks for the suggestion :)

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  6. Fun list! I'm going to do it myself soon (I have found 3 or 4 good memes in the last few days, Ineed to space them out)./

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    1. Marvellous, I love a meme! Looking forward to seeing them :) Not done a meme in years then suddenly a few crop up at once :)

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  7. interesting choices: i ordered the Jerome and A Boy; look forward to them... tx...

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    1. Do let me know what you think! :D

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  8. Looking at the contents of Victorian Fairy Tales, I doubt I recommended it, although I wish I had - it looks really good. I should read it.

    And now I am looking at the table of contents of Elizabethan Love Stories and thinking "What on earth is this stuff"? Maybe I should read that, too. Please read it soon and tell me all about it.

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    1. I would have sworn you recommended it, but I can't find any post or comment suggesting that... I wonder where I came across it... I remember it being mentioned, looking it up, and deciding I wanted it. I do specifically remember looking it up. Maybe one of the comments on your blog mentioned it? Odd. Well, as I say, I can't find any such comment from you so you're right and I'm stumped. I can only assume I saw it on Tumblr or Twitter or something :)

      As for Elizabethan Love Stories - it does look intriguing! I've had it a while, and from memory I think they're the original sources of Shakespeare's plays. I wanted to finish reading Shakespeare before I started it, and I think I've only got 4 or 5 plays left to read so I should get to it quite soon I think.

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