Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening, by Robert Frost.

When I first started blogging in around 2005, every Friday a lot of bloggers used to post a poem they liked or was appropriate for their day or week. Usually, if I remember rightly, no explanation was given, just the poem. I used to like doing it, so I thought I'd try and revive the tradition, at least on this blog! So here's my first 'Friday Poetry Blogging'.


Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening, by Robert Frost.  

Whose woods these are I think I know.
His house is in the village though;
He will not see me stopping here
To watch his woods fill up with snow.  
My little horse must think it queer
To stop without a farmhouse near
Between the woods and frozen lake
The darkest evening of the year.  
He gives his harness bells a shake
To ask if there is some mistake.
The only other sound’s the sweep
Of easy wind and downy flake.  
The woods are lovely, dark and deep.
But I have promises to keep,
And miles to go before I sleep,
And miles to go before I sleep.

Comments

  1. You just can't go wrong with Frost - this is beautiful! Thank you for sharing. Incidentally, we got our first winter snow today (Seattle-area), so I got to read this on a snowy evening. :)

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    1. We're in the same area, except north of the border. Wasn't it fun today?! It's not often we receive two snowfalls before Christmas!

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    2. Ooh, will both of you will have a white Christmas? Doesn't look like we will here - it'll be the first Christmas without snow for a few years.

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    3. If we have a snowy Christmas remains to be seen. Right now it's warming up a little and the snow is melting slowly but, with this crazy weather, you never can tell. It went from -9 to +6 in one day a couple of weeks ago.

      This past summer was unusual too. We didn't have rain through all of July, I think 40 days total, which is unheard of in the rainy Pacific Northwest.

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    4. I think we had a very long period without rain as well... It's been an odd year for weather. Spring and autumn were incredibly late. I think we'll be in for it in January!

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  2. I love your idea, O, and I might just borrow it, if you don't mind!

    I recently read Frost's "Birches" and "An Old Man's Winter Night". He is one of my favourite poets!

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    1. Go for it! :) I don't know Frost very well at all, but my mother's got a "collected works" so I may have to borrow it!

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    2. Thanks!

      I went through a Robert Burns period a couple of years ago and the other day I was reading a book where words of some of his poems were part of the text. If I'd never read his poems I would never have recognized that the author was using parts of some of his poems. It was kind of exciting!

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  3. I love that poem--it's probably the only one I memorized in school that I can still remember.

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    1. I love it, too - only came across it very recently.

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  4. I hadn't heard that poem for such a long time. Brought memories of memorisation during childhood. Today though is not snowy here. Today is our first day of summer and the longest day of the year. I enjoyed Frost anyway.

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    1. Gosh, summer seems so long away.... Is it very hot?

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  5. I like how the rhymes in the stanzas come from the third unrhymed line of the previous stanza. I also like the way the last line is repeated.

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    1. Yes, so did I :) I'm glad I found this poem.

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  6. Such a lovely idea and it's always nice to read this poem again. When people quote poems I love it's like when my favorite songs come on the radio, except much more exciting.

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    1. So many people seem to love this poem, I can't believe I hadn't come across it until last week!

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  7. Very nice idea, indeed; I love poetry!
    I do like this poem, too. I know Frost, but not that well: I should read something else by him. This piece reminds me of an Italian poet, Giovanni Pascoli: there are some similarities with a couple of his poems. Pascoli's poems, though, tend to be very sad and melancholic, while this one seems to have some kind of hope (or, at least, I feel so).

    I really enjoyed it, thanks for sharing :) Merry Christmas to you and your family!

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    1. Thank you, same to you! And I'll check out Giovanni Pascoli :)

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