Top Ten Books On My Winter TBR.


Today has been extraordinarily  productive, and, the best bit of all: I've had a task which I've put off and put off for over a month (paperwork). I finally went to do it and it was already done! I must have done it during the summer in an odd fit of organisation. Before I do, though, I can't resist this week's Top Ten Tuesday.


The Top Ten Books on My Winter TBR -

  1. The Winter's Tale by William Shakespeare. Seems appropriate!
  2. The Moonstone by Wilkie Collins.
  3. Eugene Onegin by Alexander Pushkin for Marian's readalong.
  4. Dead Souls by Nikolai Gogol.
  5. The Collected Dorothy Parker by Dorothy Parker.
  6. The Magus by John Fowles.
  7. Hamlet by William Shakespeare.
  8. Daniel Deronda by George Eliot.
  9. Of Human Bondage by W. Somerset Maugham. 
  10. The Satanic Verses by Salman Rushdie.
I'm particularly looking forward to Dead Souls and Of Human Bondage, though, for some reason, they're both a tad intimidating!

But for now, Middlemarch and a cup of coffee.

Comments

  1. I just wanted to say I love that photo. It looks so warm and cosy and inviting and reminds me of a hobbit hole (one of which we all dream of having, obviously).

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    1. Aw, thank you :) It is cosy in here!

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  2. I'm reading Daniel Deronda in January so perhaps we can compare notes!

    I simply must get back into Shakespeare but I fear with all the 2014 challenges, it might not be possible yet. Sigh! I've only read 1/2 of Hamlet and I've never read a Winter's Tale.

    I would agree with you with regard to Maugham …… certainly intimidating!

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    1. Yes, we should! I do like Eliot, so I have high hopes for that.

      I can never get into Shakespeare, which is why I want to re-read some of his plays - I want to discover what I'm missing!

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  3. You'll love the Moonstone (if you haven't read it yet). It's my favorite Collins. He has a way of writing great characters!

    I don't know why I've been putting off reading Pushkin and Gogol. Something about them sounds more intimidating than Dostoevsky (a long time favorite).

    But indeed that is a good list. I should tackle my own TBR pile but because of everyday stress I sink into something lighter (sigh).

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    1. I know what you mean about Pushkin and Gogol, especially Gogol. My reason, and this isn't a good one, is that with Tolstoy, Dostoyevsky, loads of people have read them and blogged about them, most often positive and good. Even though Pushkin and Gogol aren't exactly obscure, here at least they're not as well known as Tolstoy and Dostoyevsky. For me, they feel a little ... untouchable. I know that doesn't quite make sense... They just feel a little less accessible, I suppose.

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    2. It does! While Dostoevsky and Tolstoy are seen as established (titan) classics, Gogol and Pushkin are way more known to people who are more interested in Russian lit than usual.

      Also, not to mention translations (I participated in a discussion in high school where a translator talked about the importance of translating fiction) and I am way more aware about how I approach a text when it is translated.

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    3. I've recently become much more aware of the importance of translations, too - I've read a few notoriously bad translations of Émile Zola, which at least has trained me up a bit to do a little research when it comes to the right translator rather than just select a copy blindly.

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  4. Of Human Bondage is brilliant. I reread it last year for the first time in about 20 years. It was just as wonderful, but I mostly love Maugham. I haven't read Dead Souls but I've heard it's great too.

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    1. I've read the blurb on the back of Of Human Bondage - I'm very hopeful, but still a little afraid!

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  5. I've planning on reading The Moonstone over the Christmas holidays--looking forward to that one!

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  6. Enjoy your winter reading! I just finished reading The Moonstone. It didn't blow me away, but it's a fun and the mystery will keep you intrigued.

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    1. That's kind of how I felt about The Woman in White. I did like it, it was great to read, but I kind of forgot about it not long after :)

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  7. "Hamlet" is, so far, my favourite Shakespeare! Enjoy :)

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    1. I think that's my favourite one, too!

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