Daisy.


Here's Daisy, the new edition!

As you can see she's an absolute beauty, and in remarkably good condition for an ex-battery hen. The only problems are that she is a tiny bit pale, rather light for her size, and oddly very greasy, but all this can be fixed, and probably sooner rather than later. Obviously she's very nervous - I've held her twice now and she's ok with being held, but not at all ok with being caught.

Right now she's having a look around, doing a little digging, and eating every now and again. Anne and Charlotte are being fairly good about the whole thing; there have been several disagreements already, but very brief and nothing came of it. Daisy's mainly been in the aviary (by choice), and Anne and Charlotte have been in the garden mostly (Anne sat on my knee for about 40 minutes taking little looks at Daisy: this is one of the key problems - Anne is particularly jealous). It's going to take a long time, but we'll get there.

So I'm going to return to the garden. I'll attempt to read Adam Bede, but I somehow don't think I'll get very far!

Comments

  1. She is just lovely, O!! Every time I see your hens I wish I lived in the country and could have some. Actually, in spite of living near a big city, I do sort of live in the country (actually there is a farm a block away from our home), but the pace of life here is so frenetic that it's hard to find time to have anything that you would enjoy ---- that sounds sad, doesn't it?! :-Z

    How do you tell when a hen is "pale"? I'm curious! I've heard that hens are very territorial so it's hard to introduce new ones without them getting continually pecked and picked on. You must have a touch with animals.

    I haven't been around to comment much lately …… life is hectic and I'm already looking forward to the slower summer months. I have been reading your posts though, even if I have been silent. Good luck with your new addition!

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    1. Hens usually have red faces, at least Anne and Charlotte do, and Daisy is sort of pink. When we first got Anne and Charlotte their faces were grey.

      Just had her on my knee for past 40 mins (very surprised she settled, actually), had a good look at her. She's bald on her tummy and neck, but only a little. The big problem, actually (and I feel bad writing this) - she really smells. No idea what exactly it is, but suspect it's something to do with the grease. It's shockingly bad. Need to sort that asap.

      And yes, it's going to be hard for the next few weeks. I don't know if we should have got two, but it's still an option. So far it's going fine, but it's far too early to tell.

      Noticed you were quiet on blog (heh - just looked on Feedly, see you've updated twice!). Hope all is well. I'm looking forward to summer now as well, LOVE seeing the leaves on the trees. Looking forward to seeing Daisy's first day in the sun too! :D

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    2. My friend lives up the coast and has about 100 hens & roosters on her property. She's named them all and built a VERY large coop for them. She's been able to integrate most newcomers but she's like you: she loves her hens (and roosters) and spends tons of time with them. I hope you get rid of the grease-smell soon. It sounds more than a little unpleasant.

      Yes, I have a couple of new posts but my brain is fried from busyness so I'm having a few problems writing coherent, meaningful and interesting reviews. I've got to get to it though because things are piling up. Enjoy the day with your hens!

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    3. 100 hens! Wow!

      Know what you mean about the writing problem... I have the second Proust, Midsummer Night's Dream, and Oliver Twist coming up and right now I just can't! :)

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  2. Ah, she is so lovely! Hopefully she will settle in quickly and not be nervous of being around you at all. And she does look healthy for an ex-battery hen.
    I'm actually quite jealous, I'd love a few of my own but 1) we have a cat and 2) the garden just isn't big enough.

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    1. Yes, cats can be tricky. Hearing people say "Cats don't usually go for hens" doesn't fill me with confidence!

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  3. Hi.
    I'm 1 of your followers (quite recent), and have never written a comment here. Just wondering though, are Charlotte and Anne named after the Brontes?
    (I like your blog, by the way).

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    1. Hey :) Thank you!

      Yes, Anne and Charlotte are after the Brontes. We had an Emily, but she died in February (she had liver cancer). Bad time, that. Still miss her.

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    2. Oh I'm sorry to hear that.
      What about Daisy?

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    3. The name was inspired by a recent Twitter conversation about dandelions, daisies and buttercups :)

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  4. Oh, hello, Daisy! What a beauty :) I hope you get her health issues sorted out and that other two will become friendly as well.

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    1. Thanks Riv. It's a lot better today - Charlotte's chased her once (and only once), aside from that they've not paid too much attention to her. The first step is getting them all used to each other. I did have Daisy and Annie on my knee before (had to tell Annie how beautiful she was, and how she was queen of all the hens).

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  5. Well, she's a very cute hen, I'm sure she'll get along with Charlotte and Anne really soon :)

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    1. I hope so - feel sorry for her having no friends.

      Another problem that has arisen - because I'm her friend, she's trying to establish a pecking order with ME, which has resulted in her pecking my eye! She's actually done a bit of damage. She is a lovely hen and I don't think she means any harm, but even so she's a bit scary :S

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    2. Ouch! I'm sorry >.< I hope she's at least a little bit quieter now.

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