Merry Christmas!

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I just want to wish a very Merry Christmas to all those who celebrate it, and a peaceful and happy day for those who don't! And, as it's Christmas Eve, I'll finish with my favourite Charles Dickens quote:

From Sketches by Boz by Charles Dickens (1836).
☆ ♡ ❅ ♡ ☆

Comments

  1. amd a very Merry to you, O! snowing hard here, now, but not a lot of accumulation; here's hoping i don't have to get on the roof and shovel snow again; past years we've been afraid it would collapse under the weight (we live in an old mobile home)... nice, bittersweet quote from D... i don't know why it reminds me of that quote from "The Life of Brian", "look on the bright side of life"...

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    1. We had some snow, but less than a centimetre! A lot of rain and wind; I'm afraid a rather alarming amount came down the chimney putting the fire out! (Are you any good with chimneys, is that typical?! It's a worry!). I hope you had a good Christmas? :)

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    2. a lot of chimneys have a elf hat on them that rotates with the wind and is high enough to let out smoke but not let in rain... i don't think they're a big deal too install...

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    3. As it happens I think it's the back boiler leaking, not the chimney. Was talking to the coal man today, he thinks that too. I don't even want to think about it. Very stressed out about it to be honest. About to look some stuff up on the web - hopefully if I remedy my ignorance it won't seem nearly as bad as I think. Fingers crossed, anyway! Wish me luck :)

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    4. i don't understand how it's built. does the boiler have a vent pipe thru the roof? if so it would be easy to fix with silicon around the gasket...

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    5. I had a good look this morning: what's happened is the boiler is leaking into the fire (I can't say how, I don't understand the thing at all) and the 'ceiling' of the stove is rotten. The whole thing needs replacing I'm afraid. It can still be lit and does heat the radiators etc, but I think it'll need sorting fairly quickly I'm afraid. It doesn't stay lit over night, think it goes out in the early hours). There's one more thing to try (trying to get access to the back to seal the pipe) but we're not hopeful....

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    6. by "boiler" i'm assuming you mean hot water heater... which has a fire under it, gas powered? in that case there's a hole rusted through in the bottom of it so the "boiler" needs to be replaced... they can be very heavy if the drain valve is plugged; but technically it's not a difficult job: just shutting off the service valves leading to the boiler, draining and moving it out and replacing same... but probably not something you'd want to do yourself... along with, i gather , a bit of reconstruction... i did ours, but it was heavy; i had to use some Yankee ingenuity... anyway, good luck with it and don't worry, it'll be all right...

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    7. rereading your description, tho, it sounds like something totally different, involving part of the house structure being replaced? hmmm... call me curious... problems like this tantalize me; i used to be a mechanic, automobile type...

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    8. Hot water heater, yes, and it's powered by the stove (mixed fuel - there's no gas here and electricity's very unreliable - coal's the only affordable option, ironically). And yes, I do think the boiler has a hole in. Dribbles of water towards the back of the stove (from it's 'ceiling' - not sure of right word). Enough to put the fire out late into the night. Don't think it will affect the chimney breast - the boiler seems to be attached right on the back of the stove which is actually accessible thankfully. I do have a bad feeling the stove and boiler will need to be replaced (stove is very very old anyway). We'll see - getting some stuff tomorrow to try and mend the hole. If not, new stove. I'm very much looking forward to the problem being solved to be honest! :)

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    9. tx for the explanation... it also might be cracked, which would be more likely to produce a dribble(when it cooled down?).... it would be pretty difficult to fix in that case; you might be able to weld it if it's not cast iron; even then, it might be brazed... i got rid of all that stuff when i retired, otherwise i'd come over and fix it for you...

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    10. I think it's dribbling even when the fire's on. It's hard to tell because the heat's drying off the water so fast but I've heard hissing when the fire's on and the doors are open to put coal in. I've got to go in a minute and check - my stomach's in knots! I'm convinced I'm going to check one day and find the kitchen under a foot of water...

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    11. at any rate it's something that needs attention; so long as there's adequate water in the boiler it probably won't be a danger, but if you lose electricity in your house and the boiler is filled via an electric powered water pump, be sure and not have a lit fire underneath... be safe... if you have a downhole water pump(i'm assuming you have a well for water), the same would apply... just know which switch controls the pump so you can shut it off... i apologize if all this advice is a bother; i was a handy man do- it- all person for the gas company and it's a hard habit to drop...

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    12. I'll turn the pump off. Will that stop the water as well? Could do with a handyman here! Actually, if you're about today - if you happen to know how to turn water off just to that pump or give me some key terms to search for that would bring me some peace of mind! I'm by myself today and I'm fretting rather.

      It's so tricky getting people to come out and look at it. When we tell handymen where we are they always say they don't come this far north, so we ring the Scottish folk (just a few miles up the road) and they say they don't come to England! Anyway, that's a long way of saying your advice is certainly not a problem :)

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    13. my assumptions: you do have a well and it has a water pump, submerged, or surface, connected with it; and that it is operated through a regulator which shuts in on and off depending on the pressure in the water lines(this is almost certainly true, all systems work this way that i know about). there should be a fuse box somewhere with a switch that will shut the pump on or off...
      the first thing to ascertain is where the leak is coming from. is the boiler tin?,,cast iron? or steel..? it should have two water lines going in and coming out of it... it's possible the leak may be from either one and it may just need tightening up a bit. or there may be a rusted hole or a crack in the boiler or pipes themselves. use a flashlight and a mirror to find the leak... if it really is in the tank itself, it will probably have to come out, which will involve draining it(after shutting off the water, or closing both valves on the water lines going in and out): there should be a valve at the bottom of the tank to drain it. get a standard water hose and it should screw onto the valve; then open the valve(clockwise is tightening and counter cw is loosening) and the water will(unless debris and rust are clogging up the bottom of the tank) start coming out through the hose... when it's empty, disconnect the lines/pipes at the top of the tank, disconnect whatever apparati is holding the tank in one place, and remove it. if the tank has been leaking through a rusted out spot, it needs replacing... talk to a neighbor who has a pickup, buy a new tank, and install it the reverse way you removed the old one... remember to use teflon tape on the threads of the pipe where they screw into the tank... once it's in and everything is connected, open the supply valve first, slowly, and watch for leaks. once the tank is full, slowly open the discharge pipe... then go to the fuse box and turn the switch back on..
      about the tank: it should have a temperature setting dial on it: don't set it too high. ours is set about 180 degrees and is fine; you don't want to burn your hands washing dishes... if you have more questions, i'm at mudpuddle@hughes.net... the best of luck and be careful and don't worry; the problem WILL get solved, one way or another...

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    14. mistake: i should have said to turn on the water pump at the fuse box before opening the valves into the tank...

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    15. talking to Mrs. M, the above description and procedure may be worthless... she says the boiler may enclosed in a wooden frame and in line with the chimney, which makes more sense because that's what you said in the first place; what can i say: i'm old and slow... in that case, the part about dealing with the water supply would be accurate, but removing and replacing the boiler itself would be different... i guess the drain should be something similar to what i said above, but removal may involve some carpentry and heavy lifting... if there's a valve shutting off the water to the boiler, close it and do without hot water until you can get it fixed; that would leave water, hot and cold, available to the rest of the house... if the stove is old and cast iron, then the boiler may be the same, in which case it would be very heavy: be careful... please email me some pictures? or not, if you find other help... i'm not proud; i just want to see the problem fixed... good luck...

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    16. "to the rest of the house:": well, not if all the hot water goes thru the boiler... which would make sense... so, cold water, anyway...

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    17. Thanks for going so into detail. I'll print all this off and have a good look at it when I'm in front of it. I don't think I'll be replacing the fire myself - may have to attempt to get *someone* in, how I don't know but I'll have a word with either the coal man or the chimney sweep - they'll know if anyone would. But I'll sort the water out tomorrow. I'll let you know! :)

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  2. A very Merry Christmas to you, O, and peace and happiness in the new year! I am going to answer your PM, honestly ...... I've been deluged under a number of goings-on. Here's to a better reading year for us all and more read-alongs!

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    1. Thank you, and not to worry, Christmas is such a busy time of year! I hope I have a better reading year next year - I was looking at the Goodreads 'Your year in books' thing and I've read significantly less than normal. I went through quite a lull over summer, just reading short works and plays, which was repeated in December. I hope you had a good Christmas!

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    1. Thank you, I hope you had a lovely day <3

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  4. I know this is a bit late, but Merry Christmas to you and all your loved ones! Wishing you the very best!!Hope you had a wonderful day!

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    1. I did, thank you, very peaceful :) Did you have a good Christmas? I hope so :)

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    2. I did...Had a wonderful Christmas with friends and food!

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